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At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf (cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.)

I don't remember well, I should re-read the chapter, but there was a trouble with simulation and bisimulation that made them not sufficient for computational equivalences.

Thus Robin Milner introduces his Pi-Calculus and exposeexposes it for the rest of the book.

Ultimately, in his last book The Space and Motion of Communicating Agents, you could have a look at Robin Milner's Bigraphs. They can model Automata, Petri nets, Pi-Calculus and other computational methodologies.

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.

I don't remember well, I should re-read the chapter, but there was a trouble with simulation and bisimulation that made them not sufficient for computational equivalences.

Thus Robin Milner introduces his Pi-Calculus and expose it for the rest of the book.

Ultimately, in his last book The Space and Motion of Communicating Agents, you could have a look at Robin Milner's Bigraphs. They can model Automata, Petri nets, Pi-Calculus and other computational methodologies.

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation. (cf Bisimulation on wikipedia)

I don't remember well, I should re-read the chapter, but there was a trouble with simulation and bisimulation that made them not sufficient for computational equivalences.

Thus Robin Milner introduces his Pi-Calculus and exposes it for the rest of the book.

Ultimately, in his last book The Space and Motion of Communicating Agents, you could have a look at Robin Milner's Bigraphs. They can model Automata, Petri nets, Pi-Calculus and other computational methodologies.

2 added 473 characters in body
source | link

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.

I don't remember well, I should re-read the chapter, but there was a trouble with simulation and bisimulation that made them not sufficient for computational equivalences.

Thus Robin Milner introduces his Pi-Calculus and expose it for the rest of the book.

Ultimately, in his last book The Space and Motion of Communicating Agents, you could have a look at Robin Milner's Bigraphs. They can model Automata, Petri nets, Pi-Calculus and other computational methodologies.

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.

I don't remember well, I should re-read the chapter, but there was a trouble with simulation and bisimulation that made them not sufficient for computational equivalences.

Thus Robin Milner introduces his Pi-Calculus and expose it for the rest of the book.

Ultimately, in his last book The Space and Motion of Communicating Agents, you could have a look at Robin Milner's Bigraphs. They can model Automata, Petri nets, Pi-Calculus and other computational methodologies.

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source | link

At the beginning of Communicating and Mobile Systems: the Pi-Calculus by Robin Milner, there is a introduction on automata and how they can simulate each other so that they cannot be distinguished : Bisimulation.

cf Bisimulation on wikipedia.