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This is a follow-up question of this onethis one.

In a previous question about exotic state machinesexotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

This is a follow-up question of this one.

In a previous question about exotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

This is a follow-up question of this one.

In a previous question about exotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

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    Bounty Ended with no winning answer by Community
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    Notice added Draw attention by Raphael
    Bounty Started worth 50 reputation by Raphael
3 adding a clear note that this is a follow-up question.
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This is a follow-up question of this one.

In a previous question about exotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

In a previous question about exotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

This is a follow-up question of this one.

In a previous question about exotic state machines, Alex ten Brink and Raphael addressed the computational capabilities of a peculiar kind of state machine: min-heap automata. They were able to show that the set of languages accepted by such machines ($HAL$) is neither a subset nor a superset of the set of context-free languages. Given the successful resolution of and apparent interest in that question, I proceed to ask several follow-up questions.

It is known that the regular languages are closed under a variety of operations (we may limit ourselves to basic operations such as union, intersection, complement, difference, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal), whereas the context-free languages have different closure properties (these are closed under union, concatenation, Kleene star, and reversal).

Is HAL closed under reversal?

2 deleted 3303 characters in body; edited title
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