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If you don't want to use comparisons, although I think the "algorithm" one that Lieuwe brought up is very nice to convey the idea, you could say that you want to reduce misunderstandings between humans and computers. After all, you're dealing with languages, and that's something very basic to humans, I guess. So why not pretend the computer is just another mind you want to talk to?

Humans created computers, so we know how the computer's mind works. But the computer usually does not "know" how our minds work. (Or what our actual intention was when we write an intricate and finely crafted bug that lives happily in the brambles of our code for many cycles ;) ) Thus, it is up to us to refine the language we use to communicate with computersthem, and reduce possibilities for misunderstandings. And that's what you do. Analogies like spellchecking or grammar are, of course, very welcome in this context.

If you don't want to use comparisons, although I think the "algorithm" one that Lieuwe brought up is very nice to convey the idea, you could say that you want to reduce misunderstandings between humans and computers. After all, you're dealing with languages, and that's something very basic to humans, I guess. So why not pretend the computer is just another mind you want to talk to?

Humans created computers, so we know how the computer's mind works. But the computer usually does not "know" how our minds work. (Or what our actual intention was when we write an intricate and finely crafted bug that lives happily in the brambles of our code for many cycles ;) ) Thus, it is up to us to refine the language we use to communicate with computers. And that's what you do. Analogies like spellchecking or grammar are, of course, very welcome in this context.

If you don't want to use comparisons, although I think the "algorithm" one that Lieuwe brought up is very nice to convey the idea, you could say that you want to reduce misunderstandings between humans and computers. After all, you're dealing with languages, and that's something very basic to humans, I guess. So why not pretend the computer is just another mind you want to talk to?

Humans created computers, so we know how the computer's mind works. But the computer usually does not "know" how our minds work. (Or what our actual intention was when we write an intricate and finely crafted bug that lives happily in the brambles of our code for many cycles ;) ) Thus, it is up to us to refine the language we use to communicate with them, and reduce possibilities for misunderstandings. And that's what you do. Analogies like spellchecking or grammar are, of course, very welcome in this context.

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If you don't want to use comparisons, although I think the "algorithm" one that Lieuwe brought up is very nice to convey the idea, you could say that you want to reduce misunderstandings between humans and computers. After all, you're dealing with languages, and that's something very basic to humans, I guess. So why not pretend the computer is just another mind you want to talk to?

Humans created computers, so we know how the computer's mind works. But the computer usually does not "know" how our minds work. (Or what our actual intention was when we write an intricate and finely crafted bug that lives happily in the brambles of our code for many cycles ;) ) Thus, it is up to us to refine the language we use to communicate with computers. And that's what you do. Analogies like spellchecking or grammar are, of course, very welcome in this context.