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The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

This question http://cs.stackexchange.com/questions/11635/particularly-tricky-recurrence-relation-masters-theoremParticularly Tricky Recurrence Relation (Master's Theorem) is the only thing I found that has a similar case with T(n/4 +1) but gives no detail about how the b was calculated.

The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

This question http://cs.stackexchange.com/questions/11635/particularly-tricky-recurrence-relation-masters-theorem is the only thing I found that has a similar case with T(n/4 +1) but gives no detail about how the b was calculated.

The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

This question Particularly Tricky Recurrence Relation (Master's Theorem) is the only thing I found that has a similar case with T(n/4 +1) but gives no detail about how the b was calculated.

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The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

CanThis question http://cs.stackexchange.com/questions/11635/particularly-tricky-recurrence-relation-masters-theorem is the master theorem still be used? Ifonly thing I found that has a similar case with T(n/4 +1) but gives no, what other method can be used? detail about how the b was calculated.

The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

Can the master theorem still be used? If no, what other method can be used?

The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

This question http://cs.stackexchange.com/questions/11635/particularly-tricky-recurrence-relation-masters-theorem is the only thing I found that has a similar case with T(n/4 +1) but gives no detail about how the b was calculated.

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Master Theorem: How to find the value of b in this recurrence relation

The master theorem is used with recurrences of the form T(n) = aT(n/b) + f(n) where a >=1 and b > 1, in which case the value of b can be easily seen from the recurrence, however I have a recurrence of the form

T(n) = T((n/4)+3) + f(n)

How do I get the value of b in this case?

Can the master theorem still be used? If no, what other method can be used?