2 your -> you are
source | link

Think of programming languages as different land vehicles: bicycles, cars, hovercars, trains.

Turing Completeness says "this vehicle can go anywhere any other vehicle can go." That is, you can compute all the same functions. Input to output, start to end.

But, that statement says nothing about how you get there. It might be on rails, it might be on roads, it might be in the air. In the same way, Turing Completeness says nothing about how you compute a function. You might use recursion, or iteration, or some weird cellular automata. You might use types or not, you might use dynamic or static techniques. But, if all you consider is functions (or sets/formal languages) you can compute, as long as youryou are Turing Complete, these features give you the same power.

Think of programming languages as different land vehicles: bicycles, cars, hovercars, trains.

Turing Completeness says "this vehicle can go anywhere any other vehicle can go." That is, you can compute all the same functions. Input to output, start to end.

But, that statement says nothing about how you get there. It might be on rails, it might be on roads, it might be in the air. In the same way, Turing Completeness says nothing about how you compute a function. You might use recursion, or iteration, or some weird cellular automata. You might use types or not, you might use dynamic or static techniques. But, if all you consider is functions (or sets/formal languages) you can compute, as long as your Turing Complete, these features give you the same power.

Think of programming languages as different land vehicles: bicycles, cars, hovercars, trains.

Turing Completeness says "this vehicle can go anywhere any other vehicle can go." That is, you can compute all the same functions. Input to output, start to end.

But, that statement says nothing about how you get there. It might be on rails, it might be on roads, it might be in the air. In the same way, Turing Completeness says nothing about how you compute a function. You might use recursion, or iteration, or some weird cellular automata. You might use types or not, you might use dynamic or static techniques. But, if all you consider is functions (or sets/formal languages) you can compute, as long as you are Turing Complete, these features give you the same power.

1
source | link

Think of programming languages as different land vehicles: bicycles, cars, hovercars, trains.

Turing Completeness says "this vehicle can go anywhere any other vehicle can go." That is, you can compute all the same functions. Input to output, start to end.

But, that statement says nothing about how you get there. It might be on rails, it might be on roads, it might be in the air. In the same way, Turing Completeness says nothing about how you compute a function. You might use recursion, or iteration, or some weird cellular automata. You might use types or not, you might use dynamic or static techniques. But, if all you consider is functions (or sets/formal languages) you can compute, as long as your Turing Complete, these features give you the same power.