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Threads called the "unit of dispatch" but what does that mean? I was looking over the web and two operating systems books but I can't find the answer. It seems that processes are defined by two characteristics: resource ownership and scheduling/execution. I understand that threads are within processes, and that there must be at least one thread. Can someone explain this to me please?

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  • $\begingroup$ Have you checked Wikipedia? Also, it's more important that you understand what threads are than the reasoning behind a particular succinct description of threads. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 13, 2018 at 21:54

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Threads are called the unit of dispatch because they are part of the process in almost all cases.Also they have states and priorities on the basis of which we can apply specific scheduling algorithm for process scheduling.

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  • $\begingroup$ What is this key role? $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 13:08
  • $\begingroup$ Thread has states and priorities on the basis of it we can apply specific scheduling algorithm. Which is supposed to be a key role or main point to care. $\endgroup$
    – mondyfy
    Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 13:13
  • $\begingroup$ OK so please edit that into your answer. $\endgroup$ Commented Dec 14, 2018 at 13:13
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"Unit of dispatch" just means "the thing that gets scheduled."

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