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I am working on some set theory and am trying to prove how a set can have the property $A^* = A$.

For set $A=\{0^n1^n \mid n \ge0\}$, I still do not understand exactly what $A^*$ is. For example, I thought $A^*$ is the enumeration of the set $A$ so

$A^* = \{\epsilon,01,0011,000111,00001111,....\}$

Any helping in at least understanding what $A^*$ is for this problem would be much appreciated!

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  • $\begingroup$ $\{0^n1^n \mid n \ge0\}$ is exactly $\{\epsilon,01,0011,000111,00001111,\cdots\}$. $\endgroup$ – Apass.Jack Jan 29 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ Can you confirm $A^*$ is the Kleenen star of $A$ in the question? $\endgroup$ – Apass.Jack Jan 29 at 1:21
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    $\begingroup$ Your set doesn't satisfy $A^*=A$. $\endgroup$ – Yuval Filmus Jan 29 at 4:57
  • $\begingroup$ If you are searching from some set $A$ satisfying $A=A^*$, try choosing $A=B^*$ for any $B$. Further, not all sets $A$ satisfy $A=A^*$, e.g. $A=\{0\}$ is surely different from $A^* = \{\epsilon,0,00,\ldots\}$. $\endgroup$ – chi Jan 30 at 11:46
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What you have written (i.e., $\{ \varepsilon, 01, 0011, 000111, \ldots \}$) is simply $A$ itself.

(Assuming $A^\ast$ is the Kleene star operation) you cannot prove $A = A^\ast$ because it is not correct.

The Kleene star $A^\ast$ is defined as the union of the powers $A^i$, where $A^0 = \{ \varepsilon \}$ and $A^{i+1} = A^i \cdot A = \{ w \cdot w' \mid w \in A^i, w' \in A \}$. An inductive argument easily shows: $$A^i = \{ w_1 \cdots w_i \mid w_1, \ldots, w_i \in A \} = \{ 0^{n_1} 1^{n_1} \cdots 0^{n_i} 1^{n_i} \mid n_1, \ldots, n_i \ge 0 \}$$

Since $A^\ast$ is the union over all such $A^i$, we obtain $$A^\ast = \{ 0^{n_1} 1^{n_1} \cdots 0^{n_i} 1^{n_i} \mid i, n_1, \ldots, n_i \ge 0 \},$$ which is obviously not equal to $A$.

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  • $\begingroup$ Yeah the * was in fact the Kleen star and I can easily disprove this with a counter example. $\endgroup$ – Ben Feb 4 at 19:58

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