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  1. If $A$ is a non-context free language, is $A^*$ a regular language?
  2. If $A$ is a non-context free language and $B$ is a regular language, is it possible that their concatenation is a regular language?
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closed as unclear what you're asking by xskxzr, Evil, Juho, Yuval Filmus, David Richerby Apr 18 at 9:44

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    $\begingroup$ What do you think? What have you tried, and where did you get stuck? $\endgroup$ – Yuval Filmus Apr 15 at 18:07
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Let $A$ be $\{a^p\mid p\text{ is prime}\}$. Let $B$ be $\{a\}^*$.

Both $A^*$ and $A\circ B$ are regular. $A^*$ is $\epsilon+aaa^*$ and $A\circ B$ is $aaa^*$.

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  • $\begingroup$ True, but it's still regular. I'll fix it. $\endgroup$ – rici Apr 11 at 4:32
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    $\begingroup$ Note that, if $A$ is a unary language (i.e., uses only a single letter alphabet) as in this case, then in fact the star $A^*$ is always regular. See this question: Show that the Kleene star of any unary language is regular. It seems the same holds for $A \cdot \{a\}^*$, because that language consists of all strings longer than the shortest in $A$. $\endgroup$ – Hendrik Jan Apr 11 at 8:52

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