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Can anyone suggest me some good books on cryptography? I have just starting studying cryptography but I know elementary number theory, abstract algebra and algorithms. Also please mention the difficulty level of the book.

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    $\begingroup$ Andrew Tannenbaum's Computer Networks has a chapter on cryptography & gives a really good introduction into the subject. Though it is only one chapter, I would say its good for beginners & difficulty level being easy. $\endgroup$ – avi Mar 31 '13 at 17:35
  • $\begingroup$ Please see this and this meta discussion about the validity of list questions. $\endgroup$ – Raphael Apr 2 '13 at 7:49
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"Introduction to Modern Cryptography", Jonathan Katz and Yehuda Lindell. This is a great book for learning about provable security.

And for actual crypto protocols and algorithms, there's always the classic: "Handbook of Applied Crypto" by Paul van Oorschot, A. J. Menezes, and Scott Vanstone. This is more a reference book than a textbook. And its available free of cost on one of the authors web-pages.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why are these books recommendable? What does set them appart from others? What is their level? $\endgroup$ – Raphael Apr 2 '13 at 7:50
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It depends on what the purpose is, I personally read the A very short introduction to Cryptography which was a perfect guide to someone knowing nothing about this subject. If your purpose is to begin applying readily available algorithms this is a good book. If you want to get in deap and look at the functioning of algorithms you will need something more thorough

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    $\begingroup$ Why is this book recommendable? What does set them appart from others? What is its level? $\endgroup$ – Raphael Apr 2 '13 at 7:51
  • $\begingroup$ I haven't read the other, but I suspect they are quite thorough. This book is a good alternative as a first introduction to the subject. $\endgroup$ – Stefan Rasmusson Apr 2 '13 at 9:42
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I'd recommend "Understanding Cryptography", Christof Paar & Jan Pelzl, if you are self teaching some cryptography. Why? Since it can be really hard to just follow a textbook by yourself, professor Christof Paar uploaded his lectures on youtube (Introduction to Cryptography by Christof Paar) so you can have a more complete experience.

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I would have to say that Applied Cryptography by Bruce Schneier is the best I have come across. It's a good introduction, but at the same time have a detailed level.

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    $\begingroup$ @Juho Bruce Schneier. I recommend Cryptographic Engineering over Applied Cryptography, it's more up-to-date and has more usage considerations. AC is mostly a catalogue of algorithms. $\endgroup$ – Gilles Mar 31 '13 at 21:22
  • $\begingroup$ Why is this book recommendable? What does set them appart from others? What is its level? $\endgroup$ – Raphael Apr 2 '13 at 7:50
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IMHO a very good book for you may be: J. Hoffstein, J.Pipher, J. H. Silverman, An Introduction to Mathematical Cryptography. ISBN 976-1-4419-2674-6. It is published 2010 in the Springer series Undergraduate Texts in Mathematics.

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  • $\begingroup$ Why is this book recommendable? What does set them appart from others? What is its level? $\endgroup$ – Raphael Apr 2 '13 at 7:50
  • $\begingroup$ The level could be inferred via its being included in the mentioned (if I don't err, normally considered sufficiently satisfactorily edited) series of the Springer-Verlag. It is IMHO sufficiently comprehensive, over 500 pages, fairly up-to-date, containing treatments of elliptic curves and lattices. Since from OP I believe it is more the math side of crpytography rather than the more "practical" side that the poster is interested, I recommended this title rather than books by Schneier etc. $\endgroup$ – Mok-Kong Shen Apr 2 '13 at 13:15

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