-1
$\begingroup$

I recently read about the idea that the human brain might be a Turing machine (or Turing complete). If that is true then how is the brain able to reason that a certain problem is undecidable for e.g. the the liar paradox. I assume that a Turing machine will nor be able to reason that the liar paradox statement is a logical paradox with no decidable answer and will be stuck forever.

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I assume that a Turing machine will nor be able to reason that the liar paradox statement is a logical paradox with no decidable answer and will be stuck forever.

Why do you assume that? It's perfectly possible for a Turing machine to recognize a specific paradox and to have logic systems that include the concept of paradox.

Also, note that undecidability is a separate concept to paradox. A paradox is a statement that is neither true nor false: it is a property of sentences in formal systems. Undecidability is a property of languages, which are sets of finite strings: specifically the property that there is no Turing machine that correctly determines which strings are in the set and which are not.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.