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From the picture, the automata can accept $(\text L|\text D)^*$ following say $\_\text L\text D$, but in the formula above $(\text L|\text D)^*$ can't follow the $\_\text L\text D$.

So the Automata in the picture is not equivalent to the RE?

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    $\begingroup$ $(L|D)^+ \equiv (L|D)(L|D)^\ast$, hence after a word in $\_(L|D)$ there can be arbitrary many words matching $(L|D)$. $\endgroup$ – ttnick Mar 17 '20 at 8:09
  • $\begingroup$ @ttnick: Thank you! $\endgroup$ – Ning Mar 17 '20 at 8:11
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    $\begingroup$ @ttnick answers in answers, not comments, please $\endgroup$ – D. Ben Knoble Mar 17 '20 at 13:38
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They aren't equivalent. For example, the string "L__L" is described by the expression, but not accepted by the automaton (no way to have two '_' in a row).

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  • $\begingroup$ The expression does not allow two consecutive "_". Perhaps you misread a plus as a kleene star? $\endgroup$ – frabala Mar 18 '20 at 16:18

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