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If a new technology is invented for storage devices, which is the same as or speeder than RAM (bandwidth&lanecy), is it possible to make RAM obsolete and consider the storage device as the main memory?

if that happened data and program would run directly from the storage device, or the RAM or its concept (especially as temporary space) must be part of the storage device such as at the beginning addresses.

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    $\begingroup$ Your question is more about technology and market trade-offs rather than about fundamentals of computing. $\endgroup$ – Dmitri Urbanowicz May 7 at 9:16
  • $\begingroup$ No, I am talking about the concept of RAM not about technology $\endgroup$ – Computer_guy11 May 7 at 11:59
  • $\begingroup$ Then we might call the storage device "RAM". $\endgroup$ – user253751 Sep 8 at 19:41
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There is nothing special about RAM. Before electronic computers were invented, mechanical data sorters and tabulators used punched cards as their main (and only) memory. Early electronic computers used many different technologies for their main memory, including vacuum tubes, acoustic delay lines filled with mercury, the screen of a cathode ray tube and tiny rings of magnetic material looped around wires. If a memory technology was developed that was just as reliable as solid-state RAM and at the same time significantly faster and/or cheaper then it could certainly replace RAM and make it obsolete.

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    $\begingroup$ However, we would just call it RAM so there would be no change :-) "RAM" is about what it does, not about how it does it. $\endgroup$ – gnasher729 May 7 at 13:40

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