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Regarding the difference between Two Vs Dual Port RAM Here is what I understand:

The first can read and write at the same time but can't read twice or read twice at the same time while the second can read and write, read twice or write twice.

Is this correct?

Plus, Is this connected to software or hardware, let's suppose I have 2*8=16GB Ram how can I convert them from Two port to Dual port?

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  • $\begingroup$ Any help please? $\endgroup$
    – user128603
    Commented Nov 18, 2020 at 8:21

2 Answers 2

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There are many varieties of "dual-port RAM". Even though "two-port RAM" literally means the same thing, any one particular "dual-port RAM" may have big differences from some other "dual-port RAM".

Perhaps the most famous type is dual-ported video RAM, popular in the 1980s and 1990s, which supported reading and writing (but only one at a time) from one port (connected to a CPU) while simultaneously (only) reading from the other port (sending video data to the screen). That type doesn't match either of the descriptions in the original question.

Perhaps the most common type in recently-developed hardware are dual-port RAMs inside FPGAs. Some FPGA manufacturers use the terminology "true dual-port" to indicate two independent sides that can read and write, read and read, or write and write -- as mentioned in the original question -- while "simple dual-port" indicates the RAM has one write-only port and one read-only port. a b c d

"Soft CPUs" often include a register file with two or more dedicated read-only ports and one or more dedicated write-only ports.

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In Dual port RAM write and read operation can be performed independently from both ports from any location as long as there is no collision

Where as in Two port RAM port A is dedicated for read and port B is dedicated for write operation

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