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Is it possible to generate a better random number generator algorithm from an algorithm that use N number of computers with an algorithm that uses N+1 number of computers? I use the word computer here, but I believe you can use the word processor instead as not all computers are single-processor computers although I am not sure if it makes any difference as the answer would be similar I think. The algorithm can be any algorithm, but for the sake of simplicity let's say the fastest one we know, and if you can't generalize for N, let's say N = 1.

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  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by better? $\endgroup$ – user82867 Jan 1 at 20:47
  • $\begingroup$ faster, but it can be better in any other aspect. $\endgroup$ – rikuwang Jan 1 at 20:54
  • $\begingroup$ What do you mean by faster, then? Do you mean the total computing time summed across all computers, or the latency? What's the motivation for this question? $\endgroup$ – D.W. Jan 1 at 21:20
  • $\begingroup$ total computing time without summation $\endgroup$ – rikuwang Jan 1 at 21:25
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The fastest random number algorithm that we know is

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It is not very random, but it is very fast and therefore the best according to your definition. Maybe you need to rethink your definition. Maybe you should rethink the idea that there might be a “best” algorithm.

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