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In a homework assignment, it's asked

For any alphabet $\Sigma$; for all languages $L$, $M$ on $\Sigma$
Prove that $\forall n>1$, $L^n=M^n\nRightarrow L=M$

The student and I tried in vain to make a proof for $n=2$ by exhibiting distinct $L$ and $M$ with $L^2=M^2$; so much that I now think the statement may be wrong. What are your thoughts?

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What about $\Sigma^*$ and $\Sigma^*\setminus\{11\}$?

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  • $\begingroup$ That's marvelous, it works! $\endgroup$
    – fgrieu
    Sep 21, 2021 at 21:51

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