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I am looking for a realistic physical memory access trace/dump of significant, but not insane, length (on the order of 1M accesses) for the purpose of cache simulation. Preferably for a 16-bit or 32-bit RAM. Preferably in Tarmac format. The actual architecture is irrelevant. Are such files publicly available, and if so, where can I find them? (Googling did not help.)

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  • $\begingroup$ Your best bet might be to generate such a memory trace yourself, by instrumenting a single program or an interpreter for some architecture (e.g., Bochs). I'm not sure that requests for data sets are on topic here. $\endgroup$
    – D.W.
    Nov 30 '21 at 6:47
  • $\begingroup$ @D.W. I could not find requests for data sets on the list of off topic questions. Also, when I was a grad student (30 years ago), we had access to sample memory traces and used them precisely to simulate caches. So, unless those traces evaporated in the last 30 years, I hope that someone still knows where to find them. $\endgroup$
    – DYZ
    Nov 30 '21 at 7:55
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    $\begingroup$ OK! You might be right! My initial reaction might have been off-base. $\endgroup$
    – D.W.
    Nov 30 '21 at 7:58
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Incidentally, I found an answer to my question: valgrind, when instrumented with lackey tool, can capture reliable, though not perfect, traces. For example, here's how one saves the trace for ls -l:

$ valgrind --log-fd=1 --tool=lackey -v --trace-mem=yes ls -l > trace.log

Hope it helps not just me but others as well.

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    $\begingroup$ You could also use SimpleScalar if you don't mind an artificial CPU. This is useful is you need to control for details like the specifics of operating systems. $\endgroup$
    – Pseudonym
    Dec 2 '21 at 6:37

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