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I have an old file written to a DVD-R several decades ago, and it turned out this file can potentially has some value as NFT (non-fungible token). The file was published online and have been copied several times by rather famous companies. I want to prove that I own the original file.
I know that this DVD at least contains file creation date attribute. But is this enough? What if I make a .iso image of this DVD and say this proves the file has not been tampered?

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  • $\begingroup$ Well, In the first hand, you should have a commitment similar to this including the date, too. $\endgroup$
    – kelalaka
    Apr 21, 2022 at 23:01

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There's no value in just owning the file of an NFT, that's why there are so many memes about right clicking JPEGs and saving them. Owning the smart contract is what really matters in the NFT world, so even if you had the original file that represents the backing asset by how the NFT is stored on the blockchain, it's irrelevant, because anybody else could also find that backing asset and then make another DVD.

In terms of verifying the file you can likely do a hash checksum and see if it matches up with the file you're curious about.

If you're curious about how NFT files are stored and assets are displayed, this is a good reading: https://art.haus/on-chain-nfts-and-why-theyre-better/

You're talking about an off-chain case.

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  • $\begingroup$ i am not talking about the 'file of an NFT'; i am talking about creating an NFT of a file which became popular, and which was created by me a long time ago; what I need is to somehow prove that I am the actual creator, nobody else $\endgroup$
    – ivan866
    Apr 22, 2022 at 9:06
  • $\begingroup$ @ivan866, I think mikinty understood what you're asking, and I think this answer remains valid. There is no technical way to prove you were the first owner, and there is no value in it anyway. $\endgroup$
    – D.W.
    Apr 23, 2022 at 7:26

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