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The problem of interest is $$ \min_{x\in\mathbb{Z}^n} \frac{1}{2}x^\top Q x + c^\top x $$ where $Q$ is a positive definite matrix. I am reasonably sure this can't be solved in poly-time, since the closest lattice vector problem (in $\ell_2$ norm) can be reformulated in the above form. Do we have a proof of $\mathsf{NP}$-hardness for a corresponding decision problem - does there exist $x\in\mathbb{Z}^n$ so that the above quadratic takes a value less than or equal to $f^* \in \mathbb{R}$?

I don't find a proof of $\mathsf{NP}$-hardness of the closest lattice vector problem in $\ell_2$ norm. If such a proof is found, then this problem is solved.

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The closest lattice vector problem is NP-hard in the $L_2$ norm. See NP completeness of closest vector problem for a reference to the proof.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you. There seems to be some inconsistencies among the links/answers. For example, the answer in the link you posted says "the shortest vector problem is $NP$-hard for any $L_p$ norm other that $L_\infty$". The cited paper by Micciancio also seems to suggest that it is hard under reverse unfaithful random reductions (and possibly not in general). Does that affect the original question? $\endgroup$
    – Sriram
    Nov 14, 2023 at 4:31
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    $\begingroup$ @Sriram, that's not what it says. It says "it is not known that...". Saying "It is not known that X" is different from saying "X". It is known that SVP is NP-hard for $L_\infty$. For $L_p$ with $p \ne \infty$, it is not known whether SVP is NP-hard (but there is evidence that it is hard). No, this doesn't affect my answer or the original question, as you are not asking about SVP -- you are asking about CVP. $\endgroup$
    – D.W.
    Nov 14, 2023 at 6:12
  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for the explanation! $\endgroup$
    – Sriram
    Nov 14, 2023 at 6:17

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