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I learned that there are two types of services in Windows , one called -service- which is in user-mode , other is called -driver service / device driver- which is in kernel-mode.

What I wonder is , do kernel-level services considered as a part of the kernel? If so , does writing kernel-mode services mean extending Operating System?

My lecturer accepts the definition of OS as , it is solely the Kernel. So I wonder if kernel-level services are included in his OS definition.

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    $\begingroup$ I voted to keep this open because it is an architecture question. While it does specifically mention Windows, it has value for other OSs. If the OP did not mention Windows, then this question would stand a change of getting closed and too broad. $\endgroup$ – Guy Coder Nov 23 '13 at 21:07
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    $\begingroup$ Note that while they are registered the same way as user-mode services, nobody actually calls them services. They're referred to as kernel-mode drivers or simply as drivers, if the context is clear. $\endgroup$ – avakar Nov 23 '13 at 21:37
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    $\begingroup$ Also, on a completely unrelated and off-topic note, there is no space before punctuation in English (there apparently is in French). Read more here: english.stackexchange.com/questions/4645/… $\endgroup$ – avakar Nov 23 '13 at 21:46
  • $\begingroup$ @avakar Thanks for the opportunity to develop my English further. $\endgroup$ – Mert Çelikok Dec 8 '13 at 16:05
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Are kernel-level services considered as a part of the kernel?

That can be debated, but for me the answer is yes.

You might run into a purist who considers only the code from the manufacturer in the kernel to be part of the kernel and extensions as an add on the kernel. I would ask you instructor for his answer, you are the customer, right?

If so , does writing kernel-mode services mean extending Operating System?

For me it surely does.

The easiest way to think of this is adding a device that requires installing a kernel mode device driver. Once the kernel mode device driver is installed all the code has access to the device driver in the same way all the code has access to the kernel. That is simplified but you should get the analogy.

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  • $\begingroup$ Clear and explanatory. Thanks for the answer. I see that in Operating Systems theory , concepts are not hardly defined. Rather , there are distinct opinions. $\endgroup$ – Mert Çelikok Dec 8 '13 at 16:04

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