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All the article I can find seems to talk about multitasking and context switch as its a two different thing. It seems that multitasking and context switch are the same thing.

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    $\begingroup$ Can you add links to some of the articles? $\endgroup$ – Guy Coder Dec 3 '13 at 1:19
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Yes, it is possible (depending upon what you mean by "context switch"). See cooperative multi-tasking. In cooperative multi-tasking, the operating system never needs to perform a context switch between tasks -- instead, tasks voluntarily take care of saving their own state and switching between themselves.

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  • $\begingroup$ What I mean by multitasking is true multitasking, doing multiple task at the same time. In cooperative multi-tasking the machine is still really only doing one thing at the time. $\endgroup$ – bingunginter Dec 3 '13 at 13:49
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    $\begingroup$ @bingunginter, well, I answered the question you wrote. If that's not the question you had in mind, you might think about how to write the question more carefully in the future: define your terms, explain why you are asking, etc. P.S. I think there might possibly be some misunderstanding about terminology here. Cooperative multi-tasking is still multi-tasking. I've never heard the term "true multi-tasking" before. And even in preemptive multi-tasking, on a single-core machine the computer is still really only doing one thing at a time. $\endgroup$ – D.W. Dec 3 '13 at 16:48
  • $\begingroup$ @bingunginter: You are not the one who decides what "true" multitasking is. Cooperative multitasking is true multitasking using a distributed scheduler :-) MacOS 9 on multi-CPU machines could run two tasks simultaneously with cooperative multitasking. If you modified it to run on a modern dual core CPU with hyperthreading, it would run four tasks simultaneously with a single CPU, if you run four applications. $\endgroup$ – gnasher729 Apr 4 '17 at 23:59
  • $\begingroup$ @bingunginter: If this is how you define "true multitasking," then a single CPU can not do true multitasking with context switches or without them. Anyway, as this question already has answers, I suggest that you write a new better defined question. $\endgroup$ – beroal Apr 7 '17 at 10:19
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There are Superscalar and Vector Processors.

In order to truly multitask you have to be able to do multiple things at the same time. Normally this is done within human perception by context switching, it really only appears to do more than one thing at a time through, really its just like two people sharing a hammer and a bucket of nails, if they do it right, its like having two hammers and two nails as far as productivity, but to really multitask, you need more than one hammer or a hammer that can hit multiple nails at once.

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