1
$\begingroup$

While reading Stallings OS Internals and Design, I run into problem. Here is example from the book.

For example, consider a simplified computer in which each instruction occupies one 16-bit word of memory. Assume that the PC is set to the location 300. On succeeding instruction cycles, it will fetch instructions from locations 301, 302, ...

My question is: If the length of instructions is 16bits, and the smallest addressable unit of the memory is 1B, why on succeeding instruction cycles it will fetch instructions from locations 301 and 302, and not multiples of two, 302 and 304?

Is the memory then organised as a sequence of 16bit long memory words?

$\endgroup$
1
$\begingroup$

I too read the book. If Dr. Stallings has quoted this, the memory locations 301 and 302 must be referring to word-wise and not byte-wise locations.

| cite | improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.