1
$\begingroup$

I'm a GCSE Computing student and I've been asked to compare writing programs in a block programming environment (I think this means using programs such as Scratch or App Inventor but I'm not entirely sure) compared to writing programs using high level programming languages such as Python, Java etc. I'm honestly not trying to ask you to do my work for me, I just desperately need some help on the advantages and disadvantages of both ways of writing programs because we haven't really been taught it by my teacher and I haven't found much on the Internet about it.

$\endgroup$
3
  • 3
    $\begingroup$ I don't think you're likely to get answers of the type you want here. Should we migrate this to Software Engineering? $\endgroup$
    – Raphael
    Commented May 5, 2014 at 12:45
  • $\begingroup$ As for the question itself, have you tried programming the same thing in several languages? You might be able to work out advantages for yourself which you can then complement by stuff you find online. $\endgroup$
    – Raphael
    Commented May 6, 2014 at 9:04
  • $\begingroup$ it would help if you at least define "block programming environment" (sorry its not clear to me either). however try this highrated question on visual programming languages $\endgroup$
    – vzn
    Commented May 6, 2014 at 15:06

2 Answers 2

1
$\begingroup$

Scratch is a Turing-complete language, so any problem that can be solved with computers can be solved using Scratch (just like Python or Java). However, you would have to reduce the problem to one that can be solved with Scratch.

In application, Scratch can't do anything that you may be interested in as an engineer, such as hardware interfacing.

$\endgroup$
-2
$\begingroup$

I'm doing the same course right now and I'm having the same problem but i do know that block programming languages like app inventor are easier to use because you don't need to (effectively) learn a completley new language and the syntax that goes with it all you need to learn is what task the blocks perform and how they fit together.

$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ This is not an answer to the question. $\endgroup$ Commented May 5, 2014 at 10:19

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.