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The book I'm currently reading specifies that Dynamic Power = (1/2) * Capacitive Load * (V^2) * frequency However, that is assuming it's a single-core system. I wonder if we're calculating the Dynamic Power of a dual-core system, would that be twice the formula of Dynamic Power above ?

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  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps you could define you terminology. I have never heard of dynamic power or of capacitative load. $\endgroup$ – Yuval Filmus Sep 21 '14 at 5:26
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    $\begingroup$ The capacitive load of a dual-core system would be (roughly, ignoring, e.g., sharing parts of the memory hierarchy) twice that of a single core system (with the same core implementation), so the formula would be unchanged. (Of course, the frequency and even the voltage for different cores might be independently adjustable.) This type of question might be a better fit on the Electrical Engineering SE. You might want to flag this for migration. $\endgroup$ – Paul A. Clayton Sep 21 '14 at 7:16
  • $\begingroup$ @PaulA.Clayton Thanks! This is actually from my Computer Architecture class, so I thought I would ask it here. But you've clarified everything because the book never says anything about doubling the Capacitive Load for a dual-core system. There was just this one question that was comparing Dynamic Power of a single-core system and Dynamic Power of a dual-core system with same f and V but the solution multiplies Dynamic Power of the dual-core system by 2. Now I understand it was because the capacitive load doubles. $\endgroup$ – user141865 Sep 21 '14 at 15:07
  • $\begingroup$ @PaulA.Clayton, I think you could turn your comment into an answer. $\endgroup$ – Wandering Logic Oct 10 '14 at 20:32
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The capacitive load of a dual-core system would be (roughly, ignoring, e.g., sharing parts of the memory hierarchy) twice that of a single core system (with the same core implementation), so the formula would be unchanged.

(Of course, the frequency and even the voltage for different cores might be independently adjustable.)

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