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Are there program systems that can discover the need of routines - and then design them, code them and use them as parts of the system?


Any group of humans trying to pursue an activity has to develop in a developed system, to solve their problems by formulating the issues, search for knowledge and methods, to be tested and evaluated - and to be incorporated into the common experience for the activity to be pursued. Are there some software that could be compared with a human process like that?

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  • $\begingroup$ What research have you done? Where have you looked? We expect you to do a significant amount of research before asking, and to show us what research you've done. Also, we expect you to flesh out your question to articulate exactly what your goals are, what you've considered and rejected, where you have looked for answers, etc. It's rare for a one-sentence question to be a good one. $\endgroup$ – D.W. Dec 13 '14 at 6:35
  • $\begingroup$ I didn't have a clue where to search before I asked here. To me this issue is very abstract and it wasn't trivial how to put the question. I didn't know that short questions was that bad. $\endgroup$ – Lehs Dec 13 '14 at 10:15
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    $\begingroup$ Can you give more details on your question? Do you have a specific example in mind? $\endgroup$ – Ran G. Dec 14 '14 at 20:14
  • $\begingroup$ OK! I will try. I tried to formulate a general Q, but I realize that an example could help to understand what I do ask. $\endgroup$ – Lehs Dec 14 '14 at 20:29
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There has been a lot of work in genetic programing (GP) in this vein. Automatically defined functions are a big deal in GP and figuring out how many and what kinds of ADF's you should have (the "Architecture") has been the subject of a lot of research as well. More generally some people have looked at how to use GP to create libraries that it can then work with to make new more complex functions.

GP can often create perfect solutions like reversing a list or sorting lists. More often how ever it generates approximate solutions. It is really clever what all it can do however. John Koza (a really big name in GP) used genetic programing to find entirely new circuits that had never been created before and were effectively open problems in electrical engineering. To do this he had it design everything from the ground up but it had many recognizable circuits as sub parts. One could imagine that it might have made these things faster if it had already had those designed parts in its library.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you! I don't know much about AI, I have red some book and tried some simple examples, that's all. GP was an interesting hint, but far away from my own ambitions. $\endgroup$ – Lehs Dec 13 '14 at 10:08

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