0
$\begingroup$

I was studying computer science and I learnt that Serial Data transmission is when one bit is transmitted at a time over one wire/channel. Then what does '8 bit serial' data transmission mean? I was studying about MIDI where it said it uses 8 bit serial data transmission and is asynchronous.

Also, I cannot seem to find an appropriate tag to set to this question.

$\endgroup$
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I've never heard of "8-bit serial data transmission". When I google "8-bit serial" all I find are 7400-series 8-bit shift registers. They have a serial input, 8-bits of storage, and (usually) 8-bit parallel output. You have a slightly better chance of getting an answer if you ask the mods to migrate this to electronics.stackexchange.com, but you should edit the question to give context, like where you heard of "8-bit serial data transmission" (give a reference that people can look at for themselves.) $\endgroup$ – Wandering Logic Apr 23 '15 at 14:12
  • $\begingroup$ Downvoter reason for downvote? And this is in my Computer Science textbook $\endgroup$ – Abandoned Account Apr 23 '15 at 14:41
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ ??? I gave you the reason for the downvote. You asked a question without the necessary context (the reference to the textbook: author's name, book title, year published, page number that contains the term, and a quotation of the paragraph that contains the term and is confusing you.) $\endgroup$ – Wandering Logic Apr 23 '15 at 15:55
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ I see you edited to say that this question is specifically about MIDI protocol. For that you should definitely ask the moderators to migrate the question to electronics.stackexchange.com. $\endgroup$ – Wandering Logic Apr 23 '15 at 16:01
  • $\begingroup$ Ok @Wandering Logic but how? $\endgroup$ – Abandoned Account Apr 23 '15 at 16:02
3
$\begingroup$

It was probably a rather unfortunate abbreviation of 8-N-1 serial transmission which is what MIDI uses. The 8 bits are sent serially, one at time, still.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.