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I need to know the algorithm for converting between IEEE 754-2008 decimal64 and IEEE 754-1985 double precision floating point number.

I have been working on this for the past 2 days and I match the exponents of the two different standards but my base 2 mantissas differ.

Any help is greatly appreciated.

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    $\begingroup$ What research have you done? Where have you looked? $\endgroup$ – D.W. Jun 10 '16 at 17:40
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IEEE 754-2008 specifies how to convert mantissas to binary fractions as in the case of the IEEE 754-1985 double precision floating point number.

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    $\begingroup$ If the answer is in the spec itself, why even post the question? $\endgroup$ – Raphael Jun 10 '16 at 14:49
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    $\begingroup$ @Raphael, Here are the 2 parts of the IEEE754-2008 decimal54 spec I do not understand fully: 1) If the 2 bits after the sign bit are "00", "01", or "10", then the exponent field consists of the 10 bits following the sign bit, and the significand is the remaining 53 bits, with an implicit leading 0 bit: 2) If the 2 bits after the sign bit are "11". , and the represented significand is in the remaining 51 bits. In this case there is an implicit (that is, not stored) leading 3-bit sequence "100" for the most bits of the true significand. Please explain these 2 cases. Thank you. $\endgroup$ – Frank Jun 10 '16 at 17:04
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    $\begingroup$ @Frank, this is a question-and-answer site rather than a discussion forum. In the question, we want you to articulate a narrowly focused question. In the answer, we want an answer to the question. Please don't use comments to ask follow-up questions or solicit discussion. I can't tell what you're trying to achieve with that comment or (as Raphael) says why you posted the question or the answer. Don't force us to guess what you're looking for. If you want to understand those parts of the spec, then I recommend that you post a new question asking about those specific aspects of the spec. $\endgroup$ – D.W. Jun 10 '16 at 17:43

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