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I came across the following equality of regular expressions $$(r|s)^* = (r^*.s^*)^*\,,$$ where $r$ and $s$ are two regular expressions and $.$ denotes concatenation, but I don't know how could I prove it.

My try:

I call $L(r)$ the language defined by the regular expression $r$. And I want to use the fact that two regular expressions $r$ and $s$ are equal iff $L(r) = L(s)$.

The LHS can be writen as follows: $$ L((r|s)^{*}) = \bigcup_{i=0}^{+\infty} L(r|s)^{i} = \bigcup_{i=0}^{+\infty} (L(r)^{i} \cup L(s)^{i})\,. $$

The RHS can be writen as follows: $$ L((r^{*}.s^{*})^{*}) = \bigcup_{i=0}^{+\infty} L((r^{*}.s^{*}))^{i}\,.$$

But I got stuck at this point and I don't know how to proceed.

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  • $\begingroup$ What is dot "." in the RHS of this equation? $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Andremoniy Concatenation. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 8:25

2 Answers 2

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In one direction, $$ L((r^*s^*)^*) \subseteq L(((r|s)^*(r|s)^*)^*) = L(((r|s)^*)^*) = L((r|s)^*). $$ In the other direction, $L(r) \subseteq L(r^*s^*)$ and $L(s) \subseteq L(r^*s^*)$ imply that $L(r|s) \subseteq L(r^*s^*)$, and so $$ L((r|s)^*) \subseteq L((r^*s^*)^*). $$

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Your mistake is in the step $$ L(r|s)^i = L(r)^i \cup L(s)^i. $$ Consider for example $r=a$ and $s=b$. Then $L(r|s)^i$ consists of all words (over $\{a,b\}$) of length $i$, whereas the righthand side is $\{a^i,b^i\}$.

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  • $\begingroup$ You're right, but this doesn't answer my question. $\endgroup$
    – Jay Jay
    Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 7:01
  • $\begingroup$ Well, I'm not planning to do your homework. Perhaps someone else will. $\endgroup$ Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 7:24
  • $\begingroup$ Your assumption is wrong, this is not homework. I, and some friends of mine, have been fighting this identity for a while without success and that's why I decided to post it in here, hoping to have some help. $\endgroup$
    – Jay Jay
    Commented Apr 1, 2017 at 7:43

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