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Since logical memory maps to the RAM (physical memory) it has be stored somewhere right and it will obviously take large bunch of memory of itself. Where is it stored?

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  • $\begingroup$ The question doesn't make sense unless "it" refers to something other than logical memory. Or you assume that physical memory stores something other than logical memory. $\endgroup$ – ratchet freak Jun 6 '17 at 9:54
  • $\begingroup$ Could this question be an English issue? Do you know what "logical" means? $\endgroup$ – scaaahu Jun 6 '17 at 9:58
  • $\begingroup$ Maybe you should look at: [Difference between physical/logical/virtual memory address ](stackoverflow.com/questions/15851225/…) $\endgroup$ – Phillip Williams Jun 7 '17 at 1:01
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I'm not sure what you mean by "logical memory"...

Memory is usually composed of physical memory and virtual memory. Physical memory is usually RAM, hard drives, solid-state drives, etc. It's the actual chips and stuff you plug into your computer (hence "physical").

However, it would be impractical if a larger scale OS is trying to run various applications at once and we only use this memory in a sequential manner, right? That's where virtual memory and virtual mapping comes into play. It's a matter of optimization used by the OS to improve performance.

"It" isn't exactly "stored" anywhere.

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Logical memory is stored in physical memory, and in various places on your hard drive. The usual places are a swap file (stores data from logical memory that has been modified but not used for a while), and memory mapped files. For example, software playing an 8 GB video file may "memory map" that file, which means the logical memory is increased by 8 GB, and those 8 GB are stored in the video file.

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