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I am doing a small project which explains how operations (file open, file write etc.) are done in client side and server side in network File system. Can anyone help me out providing its source code so that i can track its operation.

It would be helpful if you can explain how the process takes place in real time.

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closed as off-topic by Evil, Pseudonym, Derek Elkins, Raphael Sep 13 '17 at 5:29

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "This question does not appear to be about computer science, within the scope defined in the help center." – Evil, Pseudonym, Derek Elkins, Raphael
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Computer Science! Your question is off-topic here: we deal with computer science questions, not requests for source code (see our FAQ). Your question might be on-topic on Stack Overflow. $\endgroup$ – Pseudonym Sep 13 '17 at 3:06
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This question is very likely to be closed because it's not on topic here.

However, there is one computer science aspect to your question, which is about the design of network file systems and NFS in particular, rather than just asking for source code. To help answer that question, here are the main papers on NFS:

They may be a challenging read, but they are worth it.

The best reference that I know of is Brent Callaghan's book NFS Illustrated. If you have access to a well-stocked university library, it should be there. Also worth mentioning is RFC 1094, which is definitely not for the faint-hearted.

Almost all good operating system design books have a section on networked file systems, and will often use NFS as a case study. Additionally, almost all Unix-like open source operating systems (e.g. Linux, BSD, OpenSolaris derivatives) come with NFS implementations.

If you can use a search engine, they are not difficult to find, but it will probably help a lot if you have the paper handy.

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