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The Terms are much used in actual IT (Information Technology). Is it possible to make a difference or are this terms nearly synonyms for the same fact?

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    $\begingroup$ In many languages, literal translations of "informatics" are the word for "computer science". $\endgroup$ – Raphael Sep 19 '17 at 20:51
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I deliberately use very common, not necessarily professional resource.

Computer Science

Computer science is the study of the theory, experimentation, and engineering that form the basis for the design and use of computers. It is the scientific and practical approach to computation and its applications and the systematic study of the feasibility, structure, expression, and mechanization of the methodical procedures (or algorithms) that underlie the acquisition, representation, processing, storage, communication of, and access to information. An alternate, more succinct definition of computer science is the study of automating algorithmic processes that scale. A computer scientist specializes in the theory of computation and the design of computational systems.

source: Computer Science @ Wikipedia

Informatics

Informatics is a branch of information engineering. It involves the practice of information processing and the engineering of information systems, and as an academic field it is an applied form of information science. The field considers the interaction between humans and information alongside the construction of interfaces, organisations, technologies and systems. As such, the field of informatics has great breadth and encompasses many subspecialties, including disciplines of computer science, information systems, information technology and statistics. Since the advent of computers, individuals and organizations increasingly process information digitally. This has led to the study of informatics with computational, mathematical, biological, cognitive and social aspects, including study of the social impact of information technologies.

source: Informatics @ Wikipedia

It is for sure time and place dependent, after further research it seems that the German term Informatik was a synonym of the Computer Science at first, was adapted virtually everywhere, but evolved since 1956, and diverged with meaning, but it is still overlapping. Tt seems that currently Informatics is used more as applied Computer Science (ref: search engine coin toss).

The IT (Information Technology) in some languages has broader meaning, and simply merges telecommunication with computer sciene and informatics. Unfortunately this is not well-defined term, it is part of the language so it may vary in time up to the moment when people think it is too broad and start some finer classification.

Please see also Informatics vs. Computer Science

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    $\begingroup$ In German, "Informatik" still means "computer science", at least using the definitions I know and the one you quote. $\endgroup$ – Raphael Sep 19 '17 at 20:52
  • $\begingroup$ @Raphael it is the source of the question, so yes, of course. There are documented cases of different usage and there is no "standardized term" even for exact meaning of Computer Science so I would not split hair over it. $\endgroup$ – Evil Sep 19 '17 at 21:02
  • $\begingroup$ In Russian and in my native language "Информатика" (informatika) also means "computer science", the term used from very Soviet times, and is primitive and archaic one. "Computer Science" is the most suitable term in my opinion. $\endgroup$ – fade2black Sep 20 '17 at 6:47
  • $\begingroup$ In brazilian portuguese, "Informatics" ("Informática") is used less and less. It was a synonym for "Computer Science" but has been increasingly assimilated to "Information Technology", which has then become the preferred expression. $\endgroup$ – André Souza Lemos Sep 20 '17 at 14:28
  • $\begingroup$ I agree with @Raphael - just want to ad that a German expression for Computer Science isn't existent. But the English terms are clear. $\endgroup$ – ingeniosus Sep 20 '17 at 14:37

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