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I am in 11th grade. The only subject which I love the most is solving alegebraic equations and questions related to it. I enjoy doing trigonometry but hate the part of proving theorems. I opted computer science for the first time. This is just basic. But whenever I can't understand a CS question, I doubt that I should go for cs or for maths in my bachelors. I don't know which subject is more related to my interest and talent. Would somebody please explain it?

Sorry for the tags!!

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closed as primarily opinion-based by David Richerby, fade2black, quicksort, Gilles 'SO- stop being evil' Jan 8 '18 at 19:15

Many good questions generate some degree of opinion based on expert experience, but answers to this question will tend to be almost entirely based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ This depends on many things, including but not limited to your country, the institution you are intending to study at later, among others. Furthermore, any answer will be very subjective, which means this question is unfortunately not a good fit for this site. I'd suggest you ask this question in chat, but you unfortunately lack the required reputation to do so. So I'm afraid you'll have to find the answer to this question somewhere else. There should be someone at your current school that deals with questions about the continuation of your studies. I suggest you approach that person. $\endgroup$ – Discrete lizard Jan 8 '18 at 16:17
  • $\begingroup$ I enjoy doing trigonometry but hate the part of proving theorems half-serious answer: electrical engineering, then. $\endgroup$ – Tobia Tesan Jan 8 '18 at 16:33
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    $\begingroup$ For that you need to understand difference between CS and programming. You can learn programming without any science or advance math background, but CS is different preposition. Choosing career based on CS could be challenging if you find proof base problems difficult and Mathematics will be even tougher or even impossible. Higher the math higher the proof base problems. But yes, you can take CS at undergrad and choose programming as career. $\endgroup$ – Ubi hatt Jan 8 '18 at 18:15