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So first of all I've a software which basically locks/encrypts a folder with a given password. Afterwards it's almost impossible to open the folder without entering the password through the software.

I locked some of my much needed files and accidently forgot the password.

So my question is, is it possible to retrive the hash from the encrypted folder? I'm planning to brute-force if it's possible.

If it's not, then should I reverse engineer the software to open the encrypted folder without entering the password?

What other possible options do I have?

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    $\begingroup$ This question is off-topic here. It might be on-topic on superuser.com or Information Security. $\endgroup$ – Discrete lizard Mar 9 '18 at 13:00
  • $\begingroup$ Unless the software is garbage, there's no such thing as decrypting the folder without the password. You're imagining that the password is like an identity card that you show to the security guard so they let you into the building -- if you could only press the door release button yourself, you'd be fine. That's not how it should work at all. It should be that the password is like the key to a lock and, if you don't have the right key, you can't open the lock. More specifically, the password should be the decryption key. $\endgroup$ – David Richerby Mar 9 '18 at 14:07
  • $\begingroup$ To put a different emphasis on David Richerby's comment, you can't "open" the folder without a password if you were using non-garbage software, but there definitely is garbage software claiming to do such things. If you can "reverse engineer" the software to open the folder without the password, then the software is garbage and wasn't protecting anything and you should stop using it. $\endgroup$ – Derek Elkins Mar 10 '18 at 6:55
  • $\begingroup$ Won't the encrypted folder store the hash somewhere? My question is how to capture it? $\endgroup$ – SlayerDiAngelo Mar 10 '18 at 13:32

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