Linked Questions

-1
votes
2answers
527 views

Some inference about NP

this is my first question on this site. I‌ recently, study on NP. I have some confusion about this Topic, and want to propose my inference and some one verify me. I) each NP problem can be solved ...
23
votes
3answers
2k views

Why are NP-complete problems so different in terms of their approximation?

I'd like to begin the question by saying I'm a programmer, and I don't have a lot of background in complexity theory. One thing that I've noticed is that while many problems are NP-complete, when ...
1
vote
1answer
282 views

How is the complexity of algorithms to solve 3CNF (decision problem) specified? [duplicate]

For k inputs, the complexity of naive algorithm is O(2^k). I understood this one. What is meant by "the size of the instance to be solved should be polynomial in k". Is it equivalent to the statement ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

Richard Karp's 21 NP-Hard problems, the meaning of his research?

In Richard Karp's paper "Reducability among combinatorial problems" he lists 21 NP-Hard problems. Though I can somewhat understand the ideas and motivation behind the paper I am searching for some ...
0
votes
1answer
40 views

NP Problem and reduction [duplicate]

I've read that "Every problem in NP can be reduced to every NP-complete problem". I want to know why the term "Every" is important.If we have one problem in NP that is reduced to one NP complete ...
0
votes
1answer
507 views

Can someone provide an introductory example of a certificate in complexity theory? [duplicate]

Just stepping into complexity theory, I am befuddled by this notion of a certificate and can't find any utility of this concept. From my understanding, a certificate is used when you are trying to ...
3
votes
1answer
217 views

Can someone explain in a simple way what "reducible" mean in complexity theory? [duplicate]

I find the word "reducible" used in complexity theory not very intuitive, and too general taken on a face value. What does it exactly mean by problem A reducible to B? Does it mean that A can be ...
10
votes
2answers
363 views

Combinatory interpretation of lambda calculus

According to Peter Selinger, The Lambda Calculus is Algebraic (PDF). Early in this article he says: The combinatory interpretation of the lambda calculus is known to be imperfect, because it does ...
7
votes
1answer
565 views

How do we know any problem is in NP-complete if we don't know all problems in NP?

A problem is NP-complete if: It is in NP. All problems in NP can reduce to it. It's number 2 that I'm concerned with here. I would be highly surprised if we knew every problem in NP. Based on that ...
1
vote
0answers
27 views

Cyclic definition of NP-completeness [duplicate]

Trying to understand the concept of NP-completeness, I came across this pearl on Wikipedia: From NP-complete: A decision problem L is NP-complete if it is in the set of NP problems and also ...
3
votes
3answers
6k views

Why is SAT in NP?

I know that CNF SAT is in NP (and also NP-complete), because SAT is in NP and NP-complete. But what I don't understand is why? Is there anyone that can explain this?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

Proof of P ⊆ NP [duplicate]

What is the proof of P ⊆ NP? I cannot happen to find a good explanation for it. I read that the verifier will just ignore the proof and accept any proof if the ...
2
votes
2answers
678 views

Which NPC problems are NP Hard [duplicate]

I have read that TSP and Subset Sum problems are NPC problems which are also NP Hard. There are also problems like Halting Problem which is NP Hard, but not NP Complete And Wikipedia defines this as ...
5
votes
4answers
434 views

Can all NP-complete cryptosystems be broken if one is broken?

I was just reading something about NP-hard problems and cryptosystems. I was thinking: Every NP-complete problem can be reduced to another and every NP-complete problem has an equivalent (NP-hard) ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

If I solve hard instance, therefore I prove NP=P? [duplicate]

If someone (off-topic) asks a question (on-topic) like this: Suppose that he claims that $\mathcal{P=NP}$. Suppose that someone else (on-topic) gives him an instance of an NP-complete problem that ...

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