Questions tagged [computation-models]

The definition of the set of allowable operations used for computation and their respective costs. Some examples of models include Turing machines, recursive functions, lambda calculus, and production systems.

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6answers
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Differences and relationships between randomized and nondeterministic algorithms?

What differences and relationships are between randomized algorithms and nondeterministic algorithms? From Wikipedia A randomized algorithm is an algorithm which employs a degree of randomness ...
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How to show two models of computation are equivalent?

I'm seeking explanation on how one could prove that two models of computation are equivalent. I have been reading books on the subject except that equivalence proofs are omitted. I have a basic idea ...
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1answer
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Universal simulation of Turing machines

Let $f$ be a fixed time-constructable function. The classical universal simulation result for TMs (Hennie and Stearns, 1966) states that there is a two-tape TM $U$ such that given the description of ...
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Are if statements unnecessary if a program is represented as an explicit state machine?

This question occurred to me some time ago when I was thinking about whether or not if statements are fundamental in computation. Consider a program that manages a ...
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Classfication of randomized algorithms

From Wikipedia about randomized algorithms One has to distinguish between algorithms that use the random input to reduce the expected running time or memory usage, but always terminate with a ...
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1answer
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Expressiveness of modern regular expressions

I recently discussed with a friend about a website that proposed regex challenges, mainly matching a group a of words with a special property. He was looking for a regex that matches strings like <...
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Is a Turing Machine “by definition” the most powerful machine?

I agree that a Turing Machine can do "all possible mathematical problems". But that is because it is just a machine representation of an algorithm: first do this, then do that, finally output that. ...
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How to define quantum Turing machines?

In quantum computation, what is the equivalent model of a Turing machine? It is quite clear to me how quantum circuits can be constructed out of quantum gates, but how can we define a quantum Turing ...
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How is the computational power of a human brain comparing to a turing machine?

This seems related to these questions at a glance: What are some problems which are easily solved by human brain but which would take more time computers? What would show a human mind is/is not ...
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1answer
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Is a LBA with stack more powerful than a LBA without?

Even so a linear bounded automata (LBA) is strictly more powerful than a pushdown automata (PDA), adding a stack to a LBA might make it more powerful. A LBA with stack should not be Turing complete, ...
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1answer
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How can one simulate a PDA with a FIFO queue PDA?

I'm trying to figure out how a pushdown automata (PDA), which we know uses a stack (LIFO) can be simulated by a queue (FIFO). I understand that in a regular PDA, we only have access to the top most ...
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1answer
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Right moving turing machine

I am interested in simulating any turing machine with a turing machine that is allowed only to move right. I guess that it should be pretty standard material and likely it is trivial (or known to be ...
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Is there an always-halting, limited model of computation accepting $R$ but not $RE$?

So, I know that the halting problem is undecidable for Turing machines. The trick is that TMs can decide recursive languages, and can accept Recursively Enumerable (RE) languages. I'm wondering, is ...
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Splicing squares on a Turing Machine finite tape

Trying to explain a problem, I thought of a variant of Turing Machines. It is unlikely to be new, but I do not recall ever seing it before, and I wonder whether it has been used or has a name. The ...
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Quantum lambda calculus

Classically, there are 3 popular ways to think about computation: Turing machine, circuits, and lambda-calculus (I use this as a catch all for most functional views). All 3 have been fruitful ways to ...
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1answer
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Algorithm Complexity Analysis on functional programming language implementations

I've learned today that algorithm analysis differs based on computational model. It is something I've never thought about or heard of. An example given to me, that illustrated it further, by User @...
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Is non-determinism in a non-deterministic turing machine different from that of finite automata and push down automata?

Let a input string be given as $w_1w_2...w_n$. Then if a NFA is currently in state $r$ ( and has read the input upto alphabet $w_i$ ) then before reading the next input symbol the NFA splits into two ...
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How do nondeterministic Turing machines compute general function problems?

(Hope this hasn't been asked before, but I didn't find anything.) In my understanding, nondeterminism applies to decision problems only, due to the requirement of the existence of an accepting path. ...
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Do we need recursion in programming language to solve any problem?

My question is simple: If we want to be able to solve every problem, that we can solve using recursions, do we need programming language to allow us use recursions? Assuming we are allowed to use: ...
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Do Turing machines assume something infinite at some point?

In a previous question What exactly is an algorithm?, I asked whether having an "algorithm" that returns the value of a function based on an array of precomputed values was an algorithm. One of the ...
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Is there any data structure that can't be represented or described inside a computer?

We all know that, at least theoretically, there are several possible models of computation, varying in structure. Strictly speaking, there are several (not just one) models of computation that exist ...
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1answer
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Can a Turing machine have infinite states?

Does it make sense for a Turing machine to have infinite number of states ? I had previously asked a question Can Turing machines have infinite length input. From which I came to know about Type-2 ...
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$L(M) = L$ where $M$ is a $TM$ that moves only to the right side so $L$ is regular

Suppose that $L(M) = L$ where $M$ is a $TM$ that moves only to the right side. I need to Show that $L$ is regular. I'd relly like some help, I tried to think of any way to prove it but I didn't ...
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CLRS RAM model Description

I'm seeking some clarification on a description of the RAM model in CLRS on page 23, section 2.2 (Analyzing Algorithms). Firstly, it is mentioned that we assume integers are represented with $c\cdot\...
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1answer
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How can a Turing machine write the description of the n-th Turing machine?

I am trying to interpret the following problem: "Describe an algorithm for a Turing machine which receives the integer n as input and proceeds to write the description of the n-th Turing machine from ...
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How is algorithm complexity modeled for functional languages?

Algorithm complexity is designed to be independent of lower level details but it is based on an imperative model, e.g. array access and modifying a node in a tree take O(1) time. This is not the case ...
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What specifically makes quantum computers useful?

I know that quantum computers are able to process a superposition of all possible states with a single pass through the logic. That seems to be what people point to as being what makes quantum ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between RAM and TM?

In algorithm analysis, we assume a generic one processor Random Access Machine (RAM). As far as I know, the RAM machine is no more efficient than the Turing machine. All algorithms can be implemented ...
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1answer
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Machines for context-free languages which gain no extra power from nondeterminism

When considering machine models of computation, the Chomsky hierarchy is normally characterised by (in order), finite automata, push-down automata, linear bound automata and Turing Machines. For the ...
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Analog computers and the Church-Turing thesis

I'd like to quote from Nielsen & Chuang, Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, 10th anniversary edition, page 5 (emphasis mine): One class of challenges to the strong Church–Turing ...
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Please explain this formal definition of computation

I am trying to attack TAOCP once again, given the sheer literal heaviness of the volumes I have trouble committing to it seriously. In TAOCP 1 Knuth writes, page 8, basic concepts:: Let $A$ be a ...
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Models of computation: the arithmetic model, Turing machine (and …)

How is an arithmetic model defined? What relations are between it and Turing machine? Are they equivalent in some sense? Is it true that in the arithmetic model of computation, the basic ...
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1answer
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Maximal class for which function equivalence is decidable

I previously asked if it's decidable whether two primitive recursive functions are equivalent: "primitive recursive functional equivalence". The answer was no. Here is my followup. What is the most ...
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1answer
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Working of NPDA

I read that acceptance of languages by DPDA using empty stack is a subset of languages accepted by DPDA using final state because of prefix property. I understood this statement by taking an example ...
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Why are Linearly Bounded Turing Machines more powerful than Finite State Automata?

I was under the impression that our computers, being finite, are ultimately no more powerful than (extraordinarily large) Finite State Machines. However, Linearly Bounded Turing Machines are also ...
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1answer
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Combinational Logic Circuits and Theory of Computation

I'm trying to link Combinational Logic Circuits ( computers based on logical gates only ) with everything I have learned recently in Theory of Computation. I was wondering whether combinational ...
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1answer
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Smallest class of automata model whose corresponding language class contains CFL and is closed against (dis)allowing nondeterminism in the model

From a comment, an interesting question popped up. The class of CFLs (the languages recognized by PDAs) are obviously not closed under nondeterminism - what I mean by this is that deterministic PDAs ...
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Is a stack machine with a forward read iterator Turing complete?

It is well known that a machine with a single stack as only unlimited storage is not Turing complete, if it can only read from the top of the stack. I want a machine which is (slightly) more powerful ...
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Universal binary rewriting system

What is the simplest example of a rewriting system from binary strings to binary strings $$f:\Sigma^*\rightarrow\Sigma^*\qquad\Sigma=\{0,1\}$$ that can perform universal computation? Binary string ...
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1answer
295 views

Is a Turing Machine that only takes strings of the form $0^*$ Turing Complete?

You have a Turing machine that only processes input on the form $0^*$. If it is given an input without 0's, it will simply halt without accepting or do anything else. Is it Turing Complete? The set $...
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1answer
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How to simulate a bidirectional TM on a regular one with time factor four?

In Computational Complexity A Modern Approach, one claim says that if $f$ is computable in time $T(n)$ by a bidirectional TM $M$, then it is computable in time $4T(n)$ by a unidirectional TM $\tilde{M}...
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1answer
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CFG Equivalent of regular expressions

So I was wondering something about the Chomsky hierarchy. DFAs (and NFAs) accept regular languages, while NPDAs accept context-free languages. Right-regular or left-regular grammars produce regular ...
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2answers
538 views

Are nondeterministic algorithm and randomized algorithms algorithms on a deterministic Turing machine?

An algorithm on an abstract machine is a finite sequence of operations of the machine. (Correct me if I am not correct.) However, there are different kind of algorithms, such as deterministic, non-...
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1answer
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Explanation for indirect addressing

While reading about minimal instruction set computer I found out that one needs at least (for example) the ability to increment or decrement the value stored in register, a test for zero and a jump. ...
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0answers
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λ-Calculus extensions: meaning of extension symbols

When working with λ-Calculus I see lots of extensions that use other symbols such as ∀ <:Top {} ←, which are from "Types and Programming Languages" (WorldCat) by Benjamin C. Pierce. ...
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Is a PDA as powerful as a CPU?

This is a question I have stumbled upon in my exam revision and I find it intriguing: My computer is blue and it has a massive graphics card and a DVD and every- thing so which is more powerful: my ...
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1answer
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How to convert a Turing Machine program to a tiling using Wang Tiles?

This is a cross-post from a post on MathSE due to lack of answers. To illustrate my question I provide the following example. The website Online Turing Machine provides a Turing Machine simulator. ...
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Meaning of ε in NFA-ε?

In wikipedia NFA-ε transition function defined as follows $Δ : Q × (Σ ∪ \{ε\}) → P(Q)$, where $Σ$ is an alphabet and $ε$ - empty string. I don't understand the meaning of $ε$ in this context. ...
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Variant of Turing machine

How to prove that standard Turing machine is equivalent to a variant model where a string is accepted if the machine enters an accept state during computation? However, the machine may leave the ...
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3answers
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Where does the need for conditionals (if, switch, jump tables, etc…) truly arise? [duplicate]

I know that this question is a bit out-of-the-box, yet i would be glad if someone could help with a good answers for my question because it is something that is troubling my curious mind. When we ...