Search type Search syntax
Tags [tag]
Exact "words here"
Author user:1234
user:me (yours)
Score score:3 (3+)
score:0 (none)
Answers answers:3 (3+)
answers:0 (none)
isaccepted:yes
hasaccepted:no
inquestion:1234
Views views:250
Sections title:apples
body:"apples oranges"
URL url:"*.example.com"
Favorites infavorites:mine
infavorites:1234
Status closed:yes
duplicate:no
migrated:no
wiki:no
Types is:question
is:answer
Exclude -[tag]
-apples
For more details on advanced search visit our help page
Results tagged with Search options answers only user 17408

Using a computer to implement mathematics. For questions about (mathematical) optimization, (also) use the optimization tag.

1
vote
First use Yuval's advice: With p = 2^32 - 5, remove all N ≥ p (the result is 0), then sort the rest, so now you have up to 1,000 numbers in sorted order from 0 to p-1. This is trivial to do by multipl …
answered Mar 10 '17 by gnasher729
1
vote
Knowing the ratio r = A / B and nothing else about the numbers A and B, there is very little we can say about for example A / (B + 1) or A / (B - 1). We have A = rB. If for example B = 1, then A = r, …
answered Jun 17 '17 by gnasher729
8
votes
The real numbers are uncountable. The set of real numbers that can be represented in any way is countable. Therefore, almost all real numbers cannot be represented by a computer at all. The most com …
answered Mar 22 by gnasher729
2
votes
Note: You are not asked to give a list of all numbers. You are asked how many there are. A simpler question: How many integers from 1 to $10^{18}-1$ are divisible by both 2 and 3? You can figure this …
answered Jul 3 '16 by gnasher729
0
votes
Counting all such numbers less than X can actually be done quite easily in $O (\log x)$ steps with a rather large constant, which would let us find the count for large values like X = $10^{100}$ quite …
answered Jul 4 '16 by gnasher729
3
votes
They are among other things very useful for calculating logarithms, or square roots and cubic roots. For example: log x = log ($2^e * m$) = e * log 2 + log m. With 0.5 ≤ m ≤ 1, you can approximate l …
answered Jul 26 '17 by gnasher729
1
vote
If we ignore effects of overflow and assume we can square x as often as we like in constant time, then the first example clearly either stops immediately if n ≥ 2, or runs forever if n < 2. In the s …
answered Sep 23 '18 by gnasher729
5
votes
The fundamental restriction is human computer programmers' inability so far to create computers equipped with real intelligence. "Never" is a very long time, so it's hard to accept that something will …
answered Feb 14 '17 by gnasher729