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Semantics formally describe the meaning of some syntax.

3
votes
You probably shouldn't write $\cfrac{\phi(t)\Downarrow \phi(u)}{t\Downarrow u}$ for "For any terms $t,u$, $\phi(t)\Downarrow \phi(u)$ implies $t\Downarrow u$". I'll take a concrete example: Terms a …
answered Oct 19 '16 by xavierm02
4
votes
I'll write $O(p,\sigma)$ for the only $\sigma'$ so that $\langle p, \sigma \rangle \to \sigma'$ (and $\bot$ if it doesn't exist) and $D(p)$ for the denotational semantics of $p$. Note that if you … define both semantics properly, you'll most likely have $O(p,\sigma)=D(p)(\sigma)$. I'll write $S(p)$ to mean either $\sigma\mapsto O(p,\sigma)$ or $D(p)$. Now take a compiler $C:X \to X'$. Saying that …
answered Sep 26 '16 by xavierm02
2
votes
what you want easier. Calculi have fully specified semantics, while a PLs semantics is often described by a default interpreter / compiler. Some operational semantics are non-deterministic …
answered Jun 13 '17 by xavierm02