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Questions about Information theory, entropy, and information content of various sources

4
votes
How does information theory deal with truth? It doesn't. It deals with messages drawn from probability distributions, not with knowledge. Does disinformation or lie have negative amount of bi …
answered Oct 17 '16 by David Richerby
5
votes
If you consider the cube as living in a physical space, then you can get an extra factor of 24 from its orientation: assume it's sitting on a table and note the uppermost face (six options) and the fa …
answered Jun 8 '16 by David Richerby
9
votes
Multimedia data is very far from random, which is why it compresses so well. For example, a single second of video at 1920x1080 pixel resolution, with 24-bit colour and 24 frames per second is about 1 …
answered Mar 24 '15 by David Richerby
2
votes
Is it possible to achieve greater than perfect compression... No. Any lossless compression scheme that makes at least one string shorter must make at least one string longer. This is an unavoida …
answered Mar 29 by David Richerby
1
vote
This is just the ordinary English language use of the word "compact": taking up less space. As to whether it's more intelligible, eh, that's basically a matter of reader preference and very context-de …
answered Aug 5 '18 by David Richerby
2
votes
The relativity is up to an additive constant. Suppose that you express Kolmogorov complexity relative to your favourite universal Turing machine $U$, but I do it relative to my favourite UTM $V$. If t …
answered Oct 17 '17 by David Richerby
6
votes
Compressing compressed data only benefits you if the original compression wasn't very good. Good compression essentially removes all the patterns, leaving very little for any future round of compressi …
answered Dec 4 '16 by David Richerby
16
votes
The entropy you've calculated isn't really for the specific string but, rather, for a random source of symbols that generates $A$ with probability $\tfrac{8}{10}$, and $B$ and $C$ with probability $\t …
answered Nov 18 '18 by David Richerby
2
votes
The underlying problem with the example you quote is that it's informal and completely imprecise. As you say, why don't we include the size of the "simple algorithm"? Why are we allowed to assume that …
answered Jun 28 by David Richerby