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(Not enough reputation to comment, so writing here.) Unless your algorithms are secret, please post your algorithms here. Maybe someone (not me though) can find a library for you. Maybe someone can tell how long does it take to implement it. Use Git and GitHub. You can rollback bad code with this. Always write tests. This helps against regressions as you ...


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I have been implementing a branch and bound solver with heuristics for an NP-hard problem. It got complicated at some points and had to reimplement parts a couple of times. The problem was (I think), that I started implementing with only an intuition about the design and how it looks like. That is bad software engineering and is catastrophic in big project. ...


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How about adding the additional data structure of conflict set union just as like prosser?


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When a conflict is found during a recursive constraint satisfaction search there may be assignments and inferences in the call stack that have no connection to the conflict. Instead of backtracking through these ineffectual assignments at exponential cost it is better to jump backward over them in the call stack directly to the most recent assignment that ...


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The AlphaGo algorithm does not benefit from this kind of optimization. It's hard to share an intuition for why without diving into the details of the algorithm, but at a coarse level: a single small change to the board can make a dramatic change to the strategic nature of the position, so it's not clear that one can reuse calculations effectively. In ...


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VAE's have an encoder. The encoder maps an input to a latent vector. The latent vector doesn't "stick". Instead, in each iteration, we use the encoder to map to a latent distribution, sample from that latent distribution, then use the decoder to map to a reconstruction, and compute the loss. Yes, each data point is mapped to its own latent vector. Yes, ...


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