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A programming language is a formal language, informally speaking a collection of words with a well-formed set of specific rules. As such, you can write down the definition of a formal language and thus a programming language on a piece of paper. Also, if I've written down somehow digitally the definition of a programming language, surely you can represent ...


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You download the language's tools. If the language can be compiled to a "native" executable, (e.g., like "Rust") then you download the compiler, and probably a run-time support library, and maybe a linker, a debugger, etc. If the language requires an interpreter (e.g., like Ruby) or a "virtual runtime environment" (e.g., like Java) then you download those ...


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A programming language is a formal language. Most likely its context-free, sometimes context-sensitive, rarely just regular (mostly eso-langs, and some assembly languages). There usually exists a formal grammar somewhere that defines the syntax of the language. Sometimes, this grammar isn't even written down explicitly and only exists inside the reference ...


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Any Compiler, Interpreter, Assembler performs the task to encode the programming language into strings of binary instructions that the host system's processor could understand. No matter what high-level programming language you use, the programs needs to be converted into binary strings specific to the instruction-set of the processor. So on basis of my ...


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