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"How can we decrypt an RSA message if we only have the public key?" Well, we have to find the private key from the public key. This should be too hard to do in practical situations in general, since RSA algorithms are time-tested field-tested security algorithms, and people are using it carefully with long-enough bits in general. However, the exercise ...


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You'll need to factor the base of the RSA public key to be able to decrypt. That is the whole point: cracking RSA is equivalent to factoring, and factoring is (presumed to be) very hard.


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Make sure all stations transmission or frame time is same.


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In aloha vulnerable time is twice frame time. To see why this is, suppose you transmit the msg bit in 10sec(FT) to the receiver. So when you start transmission of msg bit and before completing 10 sec if anyone is transmit another msg bit than there will be collision occur same as 10sec before you transmit the msg bit than less collision occur. So we can say ...


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In simple words: ack is the way of the receiver to tell you "i got data until some num now send me from this num",now if a packet is lost it means the reciver will not get its data. If i understood your question right then we can see the acks in the 12th and 13th packets are identical,the reason is because not data was sent between them to the reciver Now ...


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They don't. The urgent flag doesn't affect the handling of the packet by routers. The urgent flag is an instruction to the TCP stack on the destination host, not an instruction to routers along the path.


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Sure. That's fine. Nothing wrong with that. Transport-layer protocols (such as UDP or TCP) use port numbers so that you can run multiple applications on the same machine without any difficulty.


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Yes and no -- the same IPv4 adress adress can be used by other computers. But only "locally", not globally. IP-adresses are often translated using things like NAT - network adress translation. Every computer I have seen has an internal IP-adress of 127.0.0.1. This adress can be used inside the computer, not from the outside. On my LAN my computer ...


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ISPs asign one IPv4 address to a customer, and your "WiFi box" acts as a router/NAT box/ DHCP server doling out addresses from a private range internally. It is possible that the "outside" IPv4 address is itself in a private range, leaving your ISP through a mere handful of IPv4 addresses via NAT (real one, your box really does PAT, port forwarding through ...


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