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the thing that needs to be grasped is how sliding window interacts with congestion control. Sliding Windows Let's say for simplicity case that sequence numbers number segments starting from one ... It is important to understand, that when ACK is received, two things can happen window is moved by one segment (segment is removed from sender window) window ...


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the answer to "is definitelly NOT is A." routing routing is done by network layer before i go in the next ones here is disabmiguity warning. B. and C. are performed by TCP which is transport layer. if the application is using a custom transport protocol on top of UDP, i.e., RTP for transmitting multimedia, then, depending on the definition, it ...


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the router should choose the longest prefix match, or the most specific prefix that matches. so, here it will choose line 2, because of longest prefix (24 bit).


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assuming that the client only sends and the server only receives and acks: (1) the server may or may not contain a buffer. Go-Back-N will function perfectly, if there is a buffer for only one packet on the receiver. However, you could include a buffer (which comes with a window) as an optimization. (2) the server should not memorize the sender window, or do ...


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the main reason for RTO to be variable is to avoid congestion collapse. if the timer is set to a too shorter value, there is a danger that the sender starts retransmitting packets, that are still being in-flight, thus overloading the network with unnecessary packets (that may end up delivered twice). The Jackobson algorithm for calculating RTO is intended to ...


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If I am running a high performance local area TCP network then I would want the timeout value to be low. On the other hand, if I am sending messages to a low performance, over loaded TCP server I would want the timeout value to be long because the server might not be able to get to my traffic right away.


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Try this one out: https://hpbn.co/ It's concerned more with connection optimization however it still introduces a lot of concepts in a top down approach, meaning, starting from the application layer moving into the transport layer, HTTP -> TCP, as opposed to a lot of networking books which will start from a bottom up approach, twisted pair cables/signal ...


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I'd recommend posting on ServerFault or Super User for help related to this issue. BTW if you don't configure the settings for the DNS forwarder in Windows Server then anything that is NOT in the DNS zone it doesn't have a response. It's up to the client to decide what to do (IE: ask the next DNS server it knows or timeout).


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