Podcast #128: We chat with Kent C Dodds about why he loves React and discuss what life was like in the dark days before Git. Listen now.
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For a system to be in deadlock it must not be able to proceed. A process may be not started, complete, waiting for a resource, processing a resource, or be deadlocked. It's normal for a process to have to wait for a resource, so deadlock only arises if it is shown that the resource can never be made available. For the information given, and absent the ...


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If only one semaphore is used to control the access to the critical section, it is not possible for deadlock to happen. That is why two semaphores are used in the problem statement since the problem is designed to, I assume, showcase deadlock. A single-semaphore-based program can protect the critical section from concurrent access as well, as demonstrated ...


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Short answer: yes, though it could be considered a "degenerate case" (that is, a case that ends up being somewhat different from most others). Long answer: the Dining Philosophers problem is really about having $n$ philosophers, and coming up with an algorithm that works for any $n$. A good algorithm should work for even "degenerate cases" like zero ...


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That is not possible, when a deadlock occurs, the system is in an UNSAFE state. A safe state wouldn't have any purpose if a deadlock could occur.


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