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First I'll say, because you didn't mention it, that you also need a strong probability and statistics background. A good place to start with CNNs is (in my opinion) the highly praised Stanford course: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL3FW7Lu3i5JvHM8ljYj-zLfQRF3EO8sYv If you are looking for more practical stuff (and on more than just CNNs), there ...


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Short answer is "Yes". Long answer is "No": As far as I am concerned the difference is limited to a specific author/lecture: (to the best of my understanding of the slides) The author of the linked slides does not want to refer to "search" as a technique like planning, but rather as a general procedure. Planning is the process of finding a set of (valid) ...


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Computer science is a very broad field - see this Wikipedia outline. Machine learning is just one topic within the field, and there are other parts of computer science that have little or no overlap with machine learning. For example, the theory of compiler design is unlikely to be of much use to you when studying machine learning. My suggestion is to ...


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