4

Yes, you use microkernel operating systems. If you use a modern Intel CPU, it includes a copy of Minix which runs on a separate processor that is embedded in the processor that you think you have. Chances are also very good that at least a few of your peripherals use microkernel operating systems internally. Moreover, you may not use any of these, but a lot ...


3

The key search terms here are FPGA and ASIC, since at this point the OS is no longer running on instructions executed by a CPU in the conventional sense. Here is a relevant result I found with a quick Google search on microkernel fpga and os kernel fpga: Susanna Nordström et al. Application Specific Real-Time Microkernel in Hardware. In the RTU, the ...


3

No, that isn't possible in general, because the page tables work at a page granularity. If the length of every buffer is an exact multiple of the page table size, and every buffer starts at a page table boundary, you could do what you're proposing, but otherwise you can't. Since buffers usually won't satisfy those conditions, it's not very useful to create ...


2

I followed your link to the “Inferno” Wikipedia page. And there it says this OS is maintained by some group as “open source”. There are two problems: The group that maintains it doesn’t even have a Wikipedia link. It is a U.K. private company exempt from filing which means it doesn’t do any business. I own a company just like that myself. So the level of ...


2

This is part of an answer. Others will probably be able to add other points. A chess platform has to do a limited number of things, while an OS has to be able to do everything that OSes do, which is unlimited. You need lots of utilities, lots of apps written, and to get those, lots of compilers and coders' tools, etc. It's a much harder thing to get off ...


2

Can anything change in a computer without the user modifying something, also while not having internet connection? Yes, definitely - computers update their own states all the time, and some of these changes will be persistent from one boot cycle to the next. The computer itself is a complex piece of hardware, and the operating system is a complex piece of ...


1

As per ghellquist, in product FreeRTOS is designed to run directly on hardware, it is the kernel, it doesn't run on a kernel. What may be confusing is that there are also Windows and Linux ports of FreeRTOS - but these are development and test environments that run the FreeRTOS kernel's core code (the code that is part of every FreeRTOS port) - so the ...


1

This is architecture specific so the following might not be true for all architectures. Normally there is a special hardware in the CPU called interrupt controller that will react to interrupts. You usually program this hardware on boot time by writing a handler for each interrupt (called interrupt service routine) and giving the interrupt controller a ...


1

A "system freeze" is normally due to the system running out of some resource and spending it's limited resources left trying frantically to fix up the mess. I.e., too much CPU load, has no processing power left for the user. Memory overload, keeps trying to free memory and gets nowhere, no time left for the user (and no memory to load programs). It might ...


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