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A Universal Assembly Language? Of course. By default, you just endow the language with a giant switch table; if (x86) then ... if (68x00) then ... if (AMD) then ... and maybe factor out the stuff that's in common between CPUs, and provide a facility for plug-ins to add new CPUs. Essentially, most or all of that is what GAS already does. You can make a ...


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As an example: Apple's Swift compiler will compile the required code for every type needed, then compare the various versions, and if two are identical then one of them is picked. For example, lots of the code for an array of unsigned 32 bit integers and for an array of signed 32 bit integers may very well be identical, while the code for an array of 64 bit ...


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Look at the Swift language where the available operators are not defined in the language, but in the standard library. There are rules that let the compiler distinguish between binary and unary operators. An expression is operands, possibly preceded or followed by unary operators, and separated by binary operators. That’s decided by the grammar, without any ...


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Should you be a good physicist to become a great aeronautical engineer? Should you be a good chemist to become a great chemical engineer? The answer to all of these questions is "no", if by "good" you mean research-level. But ultimately, engineers build things out of the results of science, and you need to understand the science to a ...


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It seems like the really high end developers have a strong computer science background. They patent new algorithms and things like that. They make 7 figure salaries working for Silicon Valley companies. I work with more normal developers and they are great but I think it would help them to know a little more computer science. It helps to understand b trees ...


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Short answer learning CS (computer science) won't make you a better programmer. But, it will give you important theoretical tools, and more importantly - it will teach you how to think. There are other options, mostly from the engineering world, that can directly teach you coding instead - if this is what you want. Long answer If your ultimate goal is ...


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I recommend Conceptual Programming with Python because it was written by mathematicians and it will get you started on a number of topics quickly.


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I don't know of a single book that covers what you want, but if you are genuinely new to programming but have a mathematical background, I think your first port of call should be: Abelson & Sussman, Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. SICP is out of print, but free online. This, I think, will teach you the basics of what you want to know ...


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In my opinion, programming is magic: you get into a small dark room and smash keyboards and poof you got infinite money. Just kidding! programming isn't magic at all, nor witchcraft. If you will learn computer science or electronics, you will know how computers actually work. There is a lot of complex physics going on behind the scenes, that allows computers ...


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