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There is no exact answer to your question. The terms "programming model" and "programming paradigm" are not exact technical terms that have fixed definitions. Depending on a context, some authors might define "programming model" in some specific way, but that will usually turn out to cover only some aspects of what people understand under "programming model"....


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Programming models bridge the gap between the underlying hardware architecture and the supporting layers of software available to applications. Programming models are different from both programming languages and application programming interfaces (APIs). Specifically, a programming model is an abstraction of the underlying computer system that ...


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A major idea of concatenative languages is that the syntax and semantic domain form monoids and the semantics is a monoid homomorphism. The syntax is the free monoid generated by the basic operations, better known as a list. It's operation is list concatenation, i.e. (++) in Haskell. In the untyped context, the semantic domain is just the monoid of ...


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Those features are almost never implemented like the lambda calculus in modern programming language implementation. In some cases, using the lambda calculus representation for datatypes has performance improvements (this is associated with so-called tagless representations). Historically, the Haskell compiler did use this representation early on, but has ...


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The question doesn't make sense. Recognizability and decidability don't apply to a program. You're confusing several different concepts: languages, strings, programs. A Turing machine operates on a string. A string is a finite sequence of symbols. A symbol is a member of a finite alphabet, for example the alphabet of 8-bit bytes (binary programs are written ...


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