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4 votes

Why are so many internet protocols text-based?

Your question can be interpreted in three ways: Why is numerical data transmitted in textual representation, as if it had been printed with e.g. printf()? Why do ...
Peter - Reinstate Monica's user avatar
3 votes

Solving/mitigating the free rider problem without requiring identification?

The term for the problem you seem most focused on is a Sybil attack whose typical solution is some form of identity. Another mitigation is a proof of work system that makes account creation expensive....
Derek Elkins left SE's user avatar
3 votes

Is a "protocol" a set of algorithms and data structures?

is a protocol a pack of algorithms and programming source codes? (in both the computer and network) No. A protocol is an abstract description of how systems communicate. Source code could be an ...
Tom van der Zanden's user avatar
3 votes

Why are so many internet protocols text-based?

Another reason for this is that textual protocols are easier to interoperate with, and a lot more flexible for the future. Older generations, especially the folks behind Unix, already went through the ...
Carlos R.F.'s user avatar
2 votes

Why is RTS/CTS optional?

Besides RTS and CTS, there are a few other "optional" signals such as DTR, DCD,... These signals are mostly about checking if the other end of the cable is ready. Ready can mean that the internal ...
Grabul's user avatar
  • 1,870
2 votes

When packets are not full?

The space isn't used if there isn't data to send. If you're writing a letter, you write as much as you need and you don't insist that the last page must be full of writing. And you don't wait until ...
David Richerby's user avatar
2 votes

What's the difference between a protocol and a distributed algorithm?

A protocol and a distributed algorithm are completely different things. A protocol is defined mechanism for communication that the communicating parties use to exchange information. It is the rules of ...
Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩's user avatar
2 votes
Accepted

The throughput of the ALOHA protocol if the Binomial distribution was used

I don't think it makes sense to use the binomial distribution. The point of using the Poisson distribution is that network nodes are assumed to want to transmit with an exponential distribution at ...
David Richerby's user avatar
1 vote
Accepted

Algorithm for allocating resources; one resource per one user who accepts it

Create a bipartite graph $G = (B+U, E)$, where $B$ is the set of books and $U$ is the set of users. The set $E$ contains an edge $(b,u)$ for every pair $(b,u) \in B \times U$ such that $b$ is one of ...
Steven's user avatar
  • 29.5k
1 vote
Accepted

Arthur-Merlin protocol

$AMA$ is basically a 3-round interactive proof system where the verifier (Arthur) is only allowed to send randomness to the prover (Merlin). I haven't seen such an explicit definition yet, but I think ...
prime_hit's user avatar
  • 928
1 vote
Accepted

Is there an existing protocol where a sender does not know who he is sending data to?

If you want strong protections for the identity/anonymity of the participants, you might be interested in systems for anonymous communication, such as Tor. If you're just interested in systems where ...
D.W.'s user avatar
  • 162k
1 vote
Accepted

Chord protocol - How should I go about mapping nodes to placeholders on the ring?

Take the last m bits of the hash. View it as a number in binary. That's how you convert the hashed value into a number. The position is a number. That should answer your questions 1 & 3. Now ...
D.W.'s user avatar
  • 162k
1 vote

Explanation for the proof "Every 2-thread consensus protocol has a bivalent initial state"

I don't understand why it can only output the input it has seen already. The reason is simple. Just too simple. Because it cannot output any input that it has not seen deterministically, where the ...
John L.'s user avatar
  • 39.1k
1 vote
Accepted

How to decide which bytes will form a packet ?(computer networks)

As pointed out in the answer by gnasher, a packet is nothing more than a sequence of bits. The actual transmission depends on the underlying physical medium. In case of wireless networks, we transmit ...
Sagnik's user avatar
  • 894
1 vote

How to decide which bytes will form a packet ?(computer networks)

A packet is a sequence of bytes. Nothing more, nothing less. When transmitting packets, a signal is formed in such a way that boundaries between packets are easily identified, and that the bytes ...
gnasher729's user avatar
  • 30.6k
1 vote
Accepted

Why is RTS/CTS optional?

RTS/CTS are signals used to control data flow when the input and output rates are different. When the rates are identical then there is no need for flow control.
user82910's user avatar

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