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3

It's an apples and oranges comparison. When you want something to be truly random, you must use a TRNG. Examples include a lottery, or a secret/private key in cryptography. When you want something repeatable, you must use a PRNG. An example is a large secret keystream for XOR encryption, generated (imperatively: identically) on both the transmit and receive ...


1

It depends on the exact encryption method you are using. 128-bit is theoretically sufficient against normal computers and 256-bit against quantum computers, as per previous answers, but you should always follow the best practice standard of the exact type of encryption you are using. This is because no encryption algorithms has perfect entropy, or in layman'...


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The seed of a pseudorandom generator that is used as a stream cipher is called a key. The most common key sizes are 128 bits and 256 bits. (That's symmetric keys, where there's no cheaper way to break than brute force. Asymmetric cryptography typically relies on keys having certain mathematical properties that make the algorithm work, but also enable better ...


3

The seed is called the key and to be secure it really depends on the usage and known computing powers. The most powerful collective power (known) is currently the bitcoin miners that they have reached $\approx 2^{93}$ SHA256 calculations per year in this year. Therefore, the effective key size must be larger than $2^{93}$ and the NIST requires a minimum of ...


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