9

Your question takes a very narrow and untrue view of what computer science is. Computer science doesn't "assume a static problem" -- there is an entire subfield studying Online Algorithms, which take input problems piece-by-piece, as just one example. Computer science is the system of methods for analyzing computing problems (i.e., making efficient ...


3

A file is a byte stream Although OSes provide some bells and whistles (such as metadata, or forks), most define a file as a sequence of 0 or more bytes. Each byte in the file is a numerical value from 0 to 255 (inclusive). There's nothing more to it. A file format is a way of giving meaning to the bytes in a file For a simple example, you could have a ...


2

Even though computer science can be understood as a science of problem solving, as a science, it is above all interested in framing (answerable) questions. Questions about problem solving methods, whose answers can then be applied to the "real world" (whatever that is), sometimes by scientists themselves, most of the time by people in other walks ...


1

An employer needs one person who is good at maths. Unless you go deep into scientific software, 90% of all programming jobs rarely require any mathematical skills at all. You will sometimes find problems in programming contests that have clever solutions if you have mathematical skills, but often very similar problems have no such clever solutions.


1

You are right, the computer saves the file name somewhere. But not, it isn't kept in a "stack" or in "memory", files are kept on external memory (disk, flashdrive, perhaps even somewhere else "on the cloud"). This memory in turn is organized to give an efficient map from file names (stored in filesystem proper data structures) ...


1

"User Interface Management" does not have a standard accepted definition that I am aware of, so you'll have to work out what they mean by it based on context.


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