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No, as Yuval Filmus explained, a Turing machine is not a scientific theory. Furthermore, something can be both a mathematical model and a mathematical abstraction; for example, if the model is an abstraction. Types of scientific theories In the physical sciences, a scientific theory is a set of rules or models that makes testable predictions that could ...


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This is called the line graph of $G$. It actually has a wide variety of uses, as seen on that Wikipedia page, and the terminology is sufficiently standard that you should be able to mention it in a paper without defining it.


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(I might be wrong, but this is my understanding.) Callbacks, especially as seen in JS, are analogous to a semantic model known as Continuation-passing style (CPS). In CPS, a program’s flow is modeled as a series of functions, each of which takes in a continuation, and calls the continuation with the function’s result when finished. As stated, this is also ...


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There is no set terminology for this. Check the definition/use of the term where it appears. Personally, I'd call it "computation", meaning the sequence of configurations the automaton goes through. And try to be consistent with this usage.


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More precisely, a "theory" in mathematics (and by extension in other deductive branches of science) is a collection of axioms, definitions and propositions proved from the above, typically acompanied by a set of tools and techniques. So, newtonian mechanics, general relativity, group theory, thermodynamics, number theory, and a host of others are "theories"....


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This variant of bubble sort, which just performs the first available swap in each iteration and repeats until sorted, is a (variation of) insertion sort. Here is the illustration. 4, 3, 2, 1 <- 4 is considered inserted into the expected place. 3, 4, 2, 1 <- 3 is inserted into the expected place 3, 2, 4, 1 2, 3, 4, 1 <- 2 is inserted into the ...


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Yes, callbacks belong to to the family of Higer-order functions. Because they're one of the simplest members of the family, they're often encountered in practice.


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OP suggested me to this here as an answer. If you are writing assembly code, you need to know what CPU it is for and its characteristics※. That is, you need to be aware of hardware details. Your could write code that works on many similar CPUs… Yet, in general, it is not portable code. That kind of code is low level code. ※: Such as available instructions, ...


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