New answers tagged

0

It can be but not necessarily. The MMU can be setup to translate adresses. There is nothing stopping you from having swapping physical adresses between, say, two logical segments and still have the same amount of logical and physical adresses. Sounds a bit unusual to me, but not impossible.


1

Using a stack for function calls does not require any special support from the processor. It's up to the compiler to decide where to put the data relative to a function call (return address, parameters, possibly reserved space for the return value). A common convention is to designate one particular register as the stack pointer. This does not require any ...


0

You need to provide a linking page table which links the page number (logical address) to the frame number (physical address) and vice versa.


0

In the olden days, you wrote up a sequence of operations to be executed (typically on punched cards, a job), and handed them to the operator to be loaded. The operating system took such a batch of commands to execute off it's input queue, ran them until the end (or something failed), and took the next one. Output was collected (probably printed out) to ...


1

This is architecture specific so the following might not be true for all architectures. Normally there is a special hardware in the CPU called interrupt controller that will react to interrupts. You usually program this hardware on boot time by writing a handler for each interrupt (called interrupt service routine) and giving the interrupt controller a ...


1

Textbooks don’t have to include everything. There should be room for you to figure out things yourself. Otherwise, how would we ever create things not found in today’s textbooks? Maintaining the TLB is a tiny bit of code in the operating system. But every single instruction accessing memory relies on the TLB. Do you think the TLB does NOT save enormous ...


Top 50 recent answers are included